Peterson Creek Wildlife Corridor Project

The Peterson Creek Wildlife Corridor Project aims to establish a wildlife corridor between the Lake Eacham section of the Crater Lakes National Park and the Curtain Fig State Forest and Yungaburra National Park which are presently isolated. The Peterson Creek Revegetation Project started in 1998, and to date (January 2016) approx. 96,000 trees have been planted. The project aims to re-establish links between the small (approximately 500 ha) and isolated Lake Eacham Section of the Crater Lakes National Park and The Curtain Fig State Forest and Yungaburra National Park. The Curtain Fig State Forest and Yungaburra National Park are adjoining but the combined area is still a relatively small area of forest, in terms of habitat for sustainable populations of animals such as the Tree Kangaroos, which inhabit this forest.

Peterson Creek Aerial Photo 2004
Aerial Photography : Bartle Frere 2004
Peterson Creek Aerial Photo 1997
Aerial Photography : Bartle Frere 1997 WTMA GIS Reference No: J359

The Aims..

The Facts..

Recent small mammal and reptile surveys have shown several native rodent species and frogs utilising the 1998 planted area

Who's Involved...

The project is a joint initiative between the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service - Restoration Services, community tree planting group TREAT (Trees for the Evelyn and Atherton Tablelands) and Landholders along Peterson Creek. The main plantings have been on the Palumbo family farm, de Tournouer family farm, Byrnes family farm, Burchill family farm, Williams family farm, Metes family farm and Mathers family farm.

Current Situation

TREAT and QPWS - Restoration Services have now planted more than 96,000 trees (January 2016) along Peterson Creek, the two photos above show the progress of the project, the top photo was taken in August 2004, while the second photo was taken before work started on the Peterson Creek project in 1997.

A list of the species planted on this project up to 2010 is available, the trees that have been planted by this project to date include species from 39 plant families, 98 genera and a total of 162 species. The full list of species is available here - species list and this list is also available sorted into plant families - families list. Species names as per Census of the Queensland Flora 2007.

Peterson Creek Research

The Peterson Creek Wildlife Corridor is one of a small number of wildlife corridors in the Wet Tropics, a number of people and organisations have undertaken research to better understand the development and functioning of wildlife corridors. This page lists some of the research undertaken in the Peterson Creek Wildlife Corridor, including where possible abstracts. Peterson Creek Research

Peterson Creek and Roads

The completion the Peterson Creek Wildlife Corridor will require provision for wildlife to cross Lake Barrine and Peeramon Roads, the following report details current methods to allow the movement of wildlife either under or over the road.

Safer, more Permeable Roads: Learning from the European Approach

Peterson Ck Planting 1998

Stage 1 of Peterson Creek

Photo of Peterson Creek Project taken in January 2000

Photo of Peterson Creek Project taken in April 2002.

Photos of Peterson Creek Project taken in January 2003

Photos of Peterson Creek Project taken in May 2006 by Lars Kazmeier & G. Vick.

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